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. that is the environment, really, and has little to do with the overall world business environment. it is a question of confidence. the insurance company, they did not think it could happen. that is the same reason, the same pressure that will keep you from getting funding. that being said, find a way. do it. when i said he will do a lot more, i believe that every person of your age or younger, every person in the earth your age or younger, can go into orbit in his lifetime if he wants to. think about that. have people been able to say that? or at least two space. >> i wanted to thank you for taking time out of your day to come and talk to us. have you ever grown tired of your craft, and if so, how do you continue and improve your drive toward your career? >> have i grown tired in designing and building airplanes? >> yes. >> you know, i thought i did when i retired. i spent the last four months of a 46-year career working 70 plus hours a week, working in the shop. i wanted to get the flying car, that new design, flying before april 1, when i was going to retire. i worked on christmas day, a few mont
, is the environment. and i'm going to end by telling a story of a young harvard college graduate, beautiful spring day in 1844 went for a walk in the woods outside of concord, and he did a little fishing, and the fishing was good. and then he came to cook the fish into a chowder. it is boston, after all. [laughter] and the wind came and flicked the flames that he was using to nearby dry grass, and a fire started, and it spread, and it spread. and eventually, it turned into a raging inferno which burn withed down more than 300 acres of prime woodland. in his own day this man was cast away, and it's hard not to see they were right because i can't think of any young man living in boston or cambridge who did as much damage to the environment as this man did. he is, of course, henry david thoreau whose book walden seems to preach a gospel, but his own life tells a very different story. his own life preaches the moral that we are a destructive species, and if you love nature, stay away from it. [laughter] as, indeed, thoreau would have done the world a wonderful amount of good if he had stayed home. now, th
somebody crazed is going into an environment where absolutely nobody, nobody has a firearm, has no way of protecting themselves. it's horrible. >> listen, you're talking about a situation that happened that doesn't happen that often. and even when we're talking about school situations, that, you know, that happen -- when they do happen they become news and it's multiple people at a time. 10s. we saw this, 26 people at one time. that's what people are trying to prevent. >> don, i'm saying the same thing happened at virginia tech. >> stand by. please, stop talking. a very good conversation. we need to continue. i will go to break when it's time to go to break. go ahead. >> my point is, somebody who's intent on doing harm, whether they have a long gun, like an ar-15 or semiautomatic pistol, be it a glock, smith & wesson, all guns capable of hitting multiple targets, and when the people that -- that the shooter is shooting at have no way of defending themselves, it -- it doesn't matter which firearm you're using. >> it does matter what firearm they're using, especially in the wake of -- 20
about the entire financial environment in the country? >> i think washington's playing with fire. i don't think they realize this is not a game. people right now are unsettled, and they are not certain about the future, and they are adjusting budgets because people plan right now. job creators make their budgets for next year now. dagen: right. >> we're deciding how many people to hire. i have a buddy in rhode island running a factory with 500 employees and told the four department heads give me plans for 20% across the board cut if the fiscal cliff hits. i mean, this is the wrong posture. we don't want people that create jobs, people that decide how many people will be hired in the next year to be having -- to have bad karma now. we want people looking forward in a positive way, how we're going to grow into new markets, how to export more. we need the country to be more competitive so we can export to china, mexico, export to canada. that's critical, growth. if we have growth, we hire more people. dagen: drew, thank you, great to see you. happy new year. >> thank you, go rg iii. dagen:
. they're out in the street. if they come here, it's a real nice environment for them. >> everybody get into the ring. we'll have the wrap session. >> this week ip to talk about unity. in this gym we are a community. >> we not only do boxing but youth development. when you walk in the door, weert not only teaching you boxing. we're also teaching you that you have to go to school. we have three or four tutors that are trying to get these kids' grades up. i used to have average like b, cs. now i get as and bs. i joined boxing to stay away from the streets and to get my life together. it literally saved my life boxing. i want these kids to go to college for the next generation. it could be more powerful in life. we're more than just tough. we're also smart. i want to become a champion, and i want to show people that this neighborhood is not only about violence. that there's people in here in the neighborhood that are determined to become somebody in life. p if i help two, three kids a year, that's already a difference. just like boxing saved me, i'm trying to save others. >> we're giving i
of that is also to educate other ceos about the importance of aviation. you talk about the tax environment. 20% of the price of your ticket is taxation. you talk about, again the regulatory environment. thees a ease of regulation in a deregulated environment. global competitiveness. you talk about the pricing of oil. this is why we're down in washington, really trying to educate and ceos elected are important in this industry. >> you have players trying to take market share. are you seeing impact of private jet companies sprouting up all over the place, trying to get folks to do private jets? >> really not yet. >> not yet. >> what i hear, is it the corporate jet is not available, i'm flying jetblue. i love that compliment. someone flying from teterboro to west palm beach, they are taking care of that corporation. >> good strategy in teterboro, i'll tell that you. >> it works for us. >> thanks so much pch wonderful to see you and merry christmas. happy holidays. you've heard concerns, tax implications, even recession fears if we go over the fiscal cliff. what happen fess we don't in steve liesm
. >> do you want that in an environment? that a is a situation that has to be addressed. i don't think it is the only situation. >> reporter: i asked earl curtis if he thought it was a good idea to arm principals and teachers. he did not. he said you really need somebody who knows what they're doing and has the training, maybe just police officers. but to put people in charge of guns with no training, is a big problem. >> many of us saw, felt it first hand, we'll reflect when we come back. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. on any new volkswagen. excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid m
was raised in a pretty strong faith environment with my family. and i certainly had this at my school. and i don't disagree with you. i think it's all sorts of things, larry. it's the lack of parental guidance, as well. i think it's the breakdown of the social fabric of the family in america and many other countries. but the particular problem for america, which no other country that has the video -- britain has mental health issues, britain has the same videos, the same hollywood movies, britain has all the social problems that america has albeit on a smaller scale. the one thing we don't have is guns. there are no assault weapons allowed for civilians. and guess what? we don't get mass shootings ever. >> you're not against handguns or rifles. >> no, absolutely not. and i fully respect the second amendment and the right to bear arms and defend yourselves. if a father or mother in a house wants to have a handgun or a pistol to defend themselves against an intruder, that is fine by me. i respect your second amendment, but nobody can tell me you need these assault weapons with 100 bullets in a
health issues, talk about parental environment, talk about a cultural decline. we are as the nra for responsible gun ownership. this was clearly not responsible. we need to have that conversation and be out in front on this. instead, they missed an opportunity blaming other people and really kind of drawing a line in the sand that didn't need to be drawn at this point. >> you're a gun owner. are you a member of the nra yourself? >> i am not. i support the nra but i'm not a member, no, sir. >> the relationship between an american and his or her gun is historic and something that creates great passion. what is your view about the specific campaign which i have been pursuing and the president is pursuing and others are pursuing which is not about banning guns, it's about banning assault weapons, getting the kind of weapons which can massacre school classrooms, these military style machines, getting those off the streets? >> right, when you have such a tragedy like we did, it was such a dark day for this nation. i think those types of conversations, talking about assault weapon bans
in this environment here now is mary, managing director with merchant forecast. you are a secret shopper, right? do i understand that correctly? >> come on. we have a team across america and the team is comprised of retail professionals. and they -- monitor stores across -- >> shop for a live. >> they shop for a living. it is a tough life. yes. they -- answer questions for us and compile the data and we publish our reports. >> the numbers that came out today were disappointing. we have now seen retail stocks fall for three days in a row because this holiday season is looking bad. is it that bad? >> it was going into last friday. and -- again, we cover the mall. going into last friday, everybody was panicked. because they weren't seeing the kind of retail -- >> retailers were panic. >> yes. those days before christmas, it spurred up. whether it pulls out the month is another store write. it looks promising for particular retailers. we have some -- we have some bright spots out there. cosmetics is great. we love ulta. lululemon setting the trend for all of that. >> two of my faves so par. >> costume je
, the psychology of the killer. second, the environment of violence in our culture. and third, the easy access to guns. each of these might explain any single event, but what we should be trying to understand is not one single event, but why we have so many of them. let's look at the facts. according to the u.n.'s office on drugs and crime, the u.s. gun homicide rate is 30 times that of france or australia. it is 12 times higher than the average for other developed countries. why is that? if psychology is the main course, we should see that we have 12 times as many psychologically disturbed people as the oecd average. we don't. in fact, america takes mental disorders seriously, treats them and doesn't stigmatize them. we do better in this area than most of our peers. is america's popular culture much worse than other rich countries? not really since it's largely the same popular culture worldwide. england and wales, for example, are exposed to virtually identical cultural influences as the u.s. yet, their rate of gun homicide is some 3% of ours. the japanese are at the cutting edge of the worl
the street and into treatment. we're not doing this in this country. >> has the environment changed, mr. lapierre? the supreme court has confirmed gun owner rights in this country, mayor bloomberg was on the program last week saying you tried to get the president not to be reelected u, you failed i this effort. each said you don't have the clout that you had politically in this town in past debates. >> the american people, i know one thing about them, they value their freedom. when the reality of the consequences of what the politicians in this town and the media and elites want to do to their rights and take them away, i think they'll do what they've done historically, defend the freedom. the american public knows the scene of the crime, it's a criminal and a victim. mayor bloomberg, new york city, if you're rich and your famous, you get your permit, if you're a .300 hitter with the mets ush get a permit, a big developer, you get a permit, wall street executive, you get a permit, the mayor's buddy, you get your permit. if you're a guy in the bronx, most in need of protection, you're flat o
dividends. they are up close to 14%, and this type of environment, where you're probably going to see another 3% to 5% selloff because of this fiscal announce, fiscal irritation, and when you get that, you should take that money and put it to work. simply because when you look at corporate america, the average company, bill, is generating a 16% to 17% return on equity, record free cash margins and a federal reserve that has the pedal to the metal. what you and i have talked about before repeatedly, $4 in taxes for every dollar in phantom spending cuts. that's fiscal irritation, but the health of corporate america will be what ultimately prevails. >> sounds like david has been reading your book, rick santelli. >> it does. >> big fan of rick. >> this is such a perverse world we live in, okay. let's look as what's happening. down 158 in stocks and that pushed the ten-year yield under 170, okay. >> really. let me get this straight. they can't get a deal on controlling out-of-control debt, so rates go down. i used to trade during graham/rudman and i remember when they couldn't get deficit
, dividend paying stocks in this environment, will, i think, be -- >> even with the, you know, our previous segment was talking about potential for big tax hikes on dividends. even with that, you'll still be going for dividend stocks? >> i think so. i heard that segment and i think we will be get an increase but we won't get that full effect going to the maximum tax rates. >> right. we can only hope there. >> looking in that 20% range. >> chad, what are your expectations? >> well, i think you're going to go over the cliff, but you're going to get a mini bargain. any market dislocation you have over the next 15 trading days, i'd be a buyer. in the long run, we have the economy that's improving, stall speed, but that will gradually increase over the course of the year. once you have some more certainty. so, you'll get some capital spending, you'll get retail investors that will be a little bit more optimistic as well as institutional inves or thes will start to click and up their equity allocation. >> where does 2013 end up for the market? >> i'm looking very positive. i'm bullish in premise
. >>? >> you got it, michelle. we're operating in an environment where, quote, uncertainty is the new normal. this is the equivalent of the last-minute christmas shopping to protect assets of going over the fiscal cliff, planners and wealth managers say it's been a banner year especially for estate planning and here's a couple of reason yes. there's a big change coming with the gift tax. right now there's a $5 million exempted and the tax rate is 35%. on midnight on new year's eve the exemption drops to 1 million and the tax rate goes on 55% and the capital gains tax rate expected to increase from 15% to 20% and the brand new 3.8% medicare tax on wage earners above 200,000 a year and a possible future cap on general deductions is all part of that renewed interest and estate planning. among those closely watching what the president and top congressional leaders do over the weekend to avoid going over the cliff, millions of married couples facing a higher tax burden. the bush-era tax law which eliminated the so-called marriage penalty for joint filers is expiring, meaning with couples with nex
by people. >> is there still a shot for consolidation in this world, in this environment, or in this sort of post too big to fail world nobody wants to try? >> there will be consolidation. when people start getting used to the prices that these places are worth. i mean remember that bank stock investors were used to seeing their institutions get bought and sold at significant multiples of book value. the returns that are coming out of banks today don't justify that kind of price. so when people start getting comfortable with what these institutions are worth they can only earn 8% or 9% on capital and 1% on -- >> we had an analyst on yesterday or the day before who said that the big winner in 2013 among the big banks was going to be jpmorgan. but that the big loser was going to be morgan stanley. do you buy that? >> no. i'm not sure that it's possible to predict that since the new year hasn't even started yet. the idea that jpmorgan could be the big winner, of course it's possible. but jpmorgan is so large and complex i'm not sure that it's possible to make that kind of prediction. >> what
with the environment, being off the grid, so there is no cell phone service here. and really, really appreciating your surroundings. the bay of fire in australia is in the most stunning, most unspoiled area of tazmania in the northwest coast. this is a place that really you have to be committed to going to, because part of the process of getting there is actually hiking for two days on these beautiful white sand dunes, and you hike -- it's not a lot of hiking, but you are definitely out there, and being a little bit adventurous. this is a place, again, that's off the grid. you're going to have no tvs, you're going to be pumping the water for your own showers. the reason you go there and the payoff, the incredible wildlife. you want to see wombats, wallabees, kangaroos, this is the place to go. hicks island is the brain child of an architect who was obsessed with how beautiful the surroundings were and wanted to celebrate that. so he built these incredible modern structures that are made of concrete, and the rooms only have three sides. that means one side is completely open to the elements. the brand-
businesses and private money and investment in private investment and the environment. >> i've been doing this almost 23 years we need certainty. we want to invest our money, but we want to know the rules aren't going to challenge. if carbon's the bag thing, that i'm not going to be disadvantaged if i'm clean. don't put me on a player field that's harder for me to compete. >> what's your plan for the second term? are you sticking around? >> what i can say is i'm very limited. we have so much work to do. >> in a statement president obama says jackson has shown an unwavering commitment to the health of our families and our children. >>> so russia may soon ban adoptions by americans. many are opposing the ban including this young whom tells me her own inspire i story about her adoption. ♪ you are my sunshine, my only sunshine ♪ ♪ you make me happy when skies are gray ♪ [ female announcer ] you know exactly what it takes to make them feel better. ♪ you make me happy [ female announcer ] that's why you choose children's tylenol. the same brand your mom trusted for you when you were y
up. it's already a financially constrained environment. but customers tax rates will go up creating less demand for my products and less revenue for me and less tax revenue for the government. i want to urge congress and senators to vote for keeping our tax cuts in place, especially for the middle class and pushing our fiscal crisis to a balanced approach. go ahead and eliminate those tax cuts for the wealthiest individuals. if we all look at it and tried to consider what was going to work for the best, we needed to look at consumer demand. consumer demand is in the 98% of us who are out there driving the economy. the economy require strong consumer sentiment and strong business. i am urging congress to take action. stop playing games. let's move on. thank you. [applause] >> thank you so much, bob. it's a wonderful to have a sensible message from a a small business who really knows what makes our country work. now, i am honored to introduce to you stu and theresa. the mother of three in maryland and will talk to us about the reality she experiences both house and mother but also wor
approach these issues and it really requires a multidisciplinary approach. what works in an environment in new york city isn't going to work in rural america, and there are 6,000 or 7,000 school districts in this country. one size doesn't fit all solutions are pretty clear. there are many things we can do, we can do now. let's not let those things that divide us, prevent us from moving forward in the things we're on agreement on now. >> let's keep talking, though, about what the nra does want to do right now, which is put armed police officers in schools. you know, there was an armed deputy assigned to columbine in and around the time of that massacre. his name was neil gardner, and he was monitoring students just offcampus when the students started shooting. he was one of the first to respond. i want to read to you what he said after the newtown massacre. he said if you live through a school shooting, you understand you don't really need these weapons. i don't know why a normal person would need an assault rifle. virginia tech had it's own police force. others did too. we are talking a
're all in a group in the roosevelt room or in the cabinet room. it is a more casual environment. they're sitting probably on couches or chairs near each other. but the problem, don, is that if the president tries to sweeten the deal to woo more republican votes, then he risks losing lots of democratic votes and vice versa. this is really an issue about the fundamental differences between the two parties, the role of government in american life, that's why it is so hard to get to a deal. >> how dramatic. who would think talking about money and fiscal issues would garner so much drama, jessica. >> reporter: well, it is washington. and it is a lot at stake. it is about people's taxes, and, you know, the social safety net in america. it is the difference between democrats and republicans. >> yeah. we're going to talk more about the money now. thank you, jessica yellin. appreciate it. to new york now, joining us rick neuman, chief business correspondent for "u.s. news & world report." i want to ask you about the tax increase if there is no deal and tax rates rise, when would workers begin
in the street. and if they come here, it's a real nice environment for them. >> everybody get into the ring. we're going to have the rap session. >> this week i want to talk about unity. in this gym, we are a community. >> we not only do boxing, we do youth development. when you walk in the door, we're not only teaching you boxing, we're also teaching you that you know you have to go to school. we have three or four tutors that we're trying to get these kids' grades up. i used to have average like b, cs, now i get as and bs. >> we're going to have to put everything we've got into that one minute. >> i joined boxing to stay away from the streets and to get my life together. so it literally saved my life, boxing. i want these kids to go to college for the next generation will be more powerful in our life. we're more than just tough. we're also smart. >> i want to become a champion. and i want to show people that this neighborhood is not only about violence, that there's people in here in the neighborhood that are determined to become somebody in life. >> if i help two, three kids a year, that's a
was a generation ago. it was a very different political environment. i mean, as we saw last week, house republicans are not really inclined to compromise on their core principles, which are keeping taxes low and the second amendment. so i think eleanor's right. the only way you can maybe get something passed is to pair it with, you know, other options that they would agree to. they'd say, okay, we're going to get more, you know, mental health resources to prevent this from happening again. and okay maybe we'll agree to some limits on guns. you know, related to that, i would point out that the nra's latest proposal would cost $7 billion according to my back of the envelope calculations. >> you mean to put police officers in every school? >> yeah. you've got 100,000 public schools. right now you have about a third of them that have armed security guards of one kind or another. so that means you've got two-thirds, 70,000, costs about $100,000 to pay a salary and benefits for a police officer so, that comes out to $7 billion. to put that in perspective, the fbi's annual budget is $8 billion. now, i don
, called the raging bull thesis. the argument we were moving from a trading environment, which they had been talking about for ten years, and moving towards a new secular bull market beginning in 2013. that means you take out the old highs. we still believe that, 1615 who take out the old highs. housing getting better, turning after six years after a horrible recession. we're looking at the energy boom in the country. we're looking at the wireless mobility aspects to technology and we're looking at the -- one other phenomenon is the competitiveness. >> does that bring mom and pop home? >> what will bring mom and pop home ultimately is losing a little bit of money in their bond funds. over $1 trillion in bond funds over the last four years. but if you look at survey work, particularly survey of consumer finance by the federal reserve board, you'll see that people still want to buy equities. that's been true for the survey for the last, you know, 10, 12 years, despite what just happened. most people don't understand this, 35 to 39-year-olds is a cohort of the americans who begin to save f
investors to market and be successful. so what do you do in an environment like this? every individual ought to have a plan. they ought to have a place they're trying to get to. if they're not there now then they ought to have a second plan for how long it takes them to get there, and under what conditions. don't do anything precipitously. individual investors have a knack for making decisions about investing in asset classes at exactly the wrong time. they need to be disciplined. >> all right. balance is another word that sort of irritates me, because when i hear democrats use balance it means higher taxes, when i hear republicans use balance, it means more spending cuts. when you say we need a balanced approach long-term, what are you talking about? >> well, actually, this, i think, is something that investors need to think about. and there are a couple of very smart people writing about the issue. i would say jeremy grantham. but the whole are we coming to the end of an era. in fact i think one of our guests today wrote a piece on this. the end of the era where we could count on 3% averag
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